Plantar Fasciitis

Questions And Answers…

Common Questions On Plantar Fasciitis Answered

 What causes plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common condition that causes pain in the heel and bottom of the foot. The condition is caused by inflammation of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue that runs from the heel to the toes. The most common cause of plantar fasciitis is overuse, particularly in people who are on their feet a lot, such as athletes or people who have jobs that require standing for long periods of time. Other risk factors for plantar fasciitis include obesity, high arches, flat feet, and tight calf muscles.

How long does it take for plantar fasciitis to heal?

Plantar fasciitis can take several months to heal. The length of time it takes to recover from plantar fasciitis varies depending on the severity of the condition, as well as the treatment methods used.

For most people with plantar fasciitis, the pain will improve within a few months with proper treatment. However, some people may experience chronic pain that lasts for six months or more, some research view recovery at 12-18 months. In these cases, it may take longer for the condition to fully heal.

Osteopathy, stretching exercises and orthotics can help to reduce pain and inflammation, and promote healing. In some cases, the use of anti-inflammatory medication or corticosteroid injections may be recommended.

It is important to note that the recovery process can be slow and it may take several months to see the full benefits of treatment. It’s also important to address underlying factors such as obesity and tight calf muscles that may contribute to the development or persistence of the condition.

Is stretching bad for plantar fasciitis?

Stretching can be beneficial for people with plantar fasciitis, as it can help to reduce pain and inflammation in the plantar fascia. However, it is important to note that the type of stretching and the timing of stretching is important.

Stretching the calf muscles and the plantar fascia itself can be beneficial in reducing tension and promoting healing. It’s important to do stretching exercises for the plantar fascia, Achilles tendon, and calf muscles on a regular basis, such as first thing in the morning, after prolonged sitting or standing, or before and after physical activity.

However, stretching cold muscles can cause injury, so it is important to warm up the muscles before doing any stretching exercises.

It is also important to note that people with plantar fasciitis should avoid exercises that cause pain or exacerbate symptoms, and it is best to consult with a physical therapist or other healthcare professional for guidance on the best stretching exercises for your individual case.

Can I still run with plantar fasciitis?

Running can be difficult for people with plantar fasciitis as it can cause pain and inflammation in the heel and bottom of the foot. However, it depends on the severity of the condition and the person’s individual tolerance for pain.

If the pain is severe or debilitating, it is best to avoid running until the condition improves. However, if the pain is manageable, it may be possible to continue running with plantar fasciitis, but you should take some precautions.

It is recommended to avoid high-impact activities such as running, or at least reduce the intensity, frequency, and duration of running. Start with low-impact activities such as walking, cycling or swimming, and gradually increase the intensity as your condition improves.

It’s also important to use proper shoes and orthotics, as well as stretching and strengthening exercises, to help reduce pain and inflammation, and to prevent further injury.

It is always best to talk with a doctor or physical therapist before returning to running or any other activity. They can evaluate your condition, recommend the appropriate treatment, and help you create a plan to gradually return to running without causing further injury.

What are the Do and don’ts in plantar fasciitis?

Here are some “do’s” and “don’ts” for managing plantar fasciitis:

Do’s:
Wear supportive shoes with good arch support and a cushioned sole.
Use shoe inserts or orthotics to support the arch of the foot.
Stretch your calf muscles and plantar fascia before getting out of bed in the morning and before activities.
Use ice to reduce pain and inflammation.
Gradually increase physical activity as your condition improves.
Maintain a healthy weight to reduce stress on the feet.
Consult with an osteopath or doctor for guidance on appropriate exercises and treatment options.

Don’ts:

Don’t wear shoes with worn-out soles or poor arch support.
Don’t walk or stand for long periods of time without taking breaks.
Don’t engage in high-impact activities such as running or jumping if they worsen your pain.
Don’t neglect to stretch before and after physical activity.
Don’t ignore the pain and continue activities that cause pain.
Don’t wait to seek treatment if your condition is severe or not improving.
Don’t self-diagnose or self-treat without consulting with a healthcare professional.

It’s important to note that everyone is different and what works for one person may not work for another. It’s important to work with a healthcare professional to develop an individualized treatment plan that works best for you.

 

What shoes should you not wear with plantar fasciitis

When living with plantar fasciitis, it is important to wear shoes that provide adequate support for the heel and arch of the foot. Here are some types of shoes to avoid if you have plantar fasciitis:

High heels: High heels can place excessive stress on the heel and can worsen plantar fasciitis symptoms.
Flip-flops: Flip-flops do not provide enough support for the heel and arch and can cause pain and inflammation in the heel and bottom of the foot.
Shoes with worn-out soles: Worn-out soles can reduce the shoe’s ability to provide adequate support, which can increase the risk of pain and inflammation.
Shoes without arch support: Shoes that do not provide adequate arch support can cause excessive stress on the heel and can worsen plantar fasciitis symptoms.
Shoes that are too tight: Shoes that are too tight can cause pressure points and rubbing, which can exacerbate pain and inflammation.

It’s best to wear shoes that provide good arch support, have a cushioned sole, and are comfortable to wear. Athletic shoes with good arch support are a good option. It’s also a good idea to consult with a doctor or physical therapist for guidance on selecting appropriate shoes for managing plantar fasciitis.

 Is it OK to keep walking with plantar fasciitis?

Our day to day activities usually mean we need to stay mobile and walk, this needs to be managed, It is generally not recommended to continue walking or standing for long periods of time, particularly if you have a flair up of plantar fasciitis as it can exacerbate the pain and inflammation in the heel and bottom of the foot. However, it is still possible to walk with plantar fasciitis as long as you take the necessary precautions to manage your symptoms.

Here are some tips for walking with plantar fasciitis:
Wear supportive shoes with good arch support and a cushioned sole.
Use shoe inserts or orthotics to support the arch of the foot.
Stretch your calf muscles and plantar fascia before getting out of bed in the morning and before activities.
Take frequent breaks while walking or standing to rest your feet.
Gradually increase the duration of your walks as your condition improves.
If you experience pain while walking, try to reduce the intensity of your activity or avoid it altogether.
An osteopath can give you the right exercises to promote the best healing and back to walking pain free again

What is policeman’s heel

“Policeman’s heel” is another name for the condition plantar fasciitis. It is a common condition that causes pain and inflammation in the heel and bottom of the foot, specifically the plantar fascia. This condition is often caused by overuse or repetitive stress to the foot, such as from prolonged standing or walking, particularly on hard surfaces. It is also more common in people who are overweight, have high arches or flat feet, have tight calf muscles, or have occupations that require prolonged standing or walking. This condition can be treated with a combination of rest, ice, stretching, physical therapy, and orthotics. In some cases, surgery may be required to repair the plantar fascia.

What is the fastest way to cure plantar fasciitis

There is no one definitive “fastest” way to cure plantar fasciitis, as the course of treatment will vary depending on the individual case and the underlying cause of the condition. However, some common treatment options that may help alleviate symptoms and promote healing include:

Rest: Avoid activities that cause pain or inflammation in the foot.
Ice: Apply ice to the affected area for 20 minutes at a time, several times a day.
Stretching: Regularly stretching the calf muscles and plantar fascia can help reduce pain and inflammation.
Treatment: A osteopath can teach you exercises and stretches to help alleviate pain and improve flexibility.
Orthotics: Wearing shoes with good arch support and cushioning, or using custom inserts or orthotics specifically designed for plantar fasciitis can help support the foot and reduce stress on the plantar fascia.
Medications: Anti-inflammatory medications may be prescribed to help reduce pain and inflammation.
Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be needed to release or repair the plantar fascia.

It’s important to work with a healthcare professional to develop an individualized treatment plan that works best for you. With the right treatment, most cases of plantar fasciitis will improve within 6-12 months. However, some cases may take longer to heal. 

What is the clinical diagnosis for plantar fasciitis

The clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, and imaging tests.

Medical History: A healthcare provider will ask questions about symptoms, including when the pain began, the location and type of pain, and any factors that make the pain worse or better. They may also ask about past injuries, any conditions that may increase the risk of plantar fasciitis (such as obesity, high arches, flat feet, or tight calf muscles), and any previous treatments for the condition.

Physical Examination: During the physical examination, the healthcare provider will evaluate the foot, looking for signs of pain, swelling, and tenderness. They may also perform tests to assess the range of motion and strength of the foot and ankle, as well as to evaluate the integrity of the plantar fascia. This may include a “Thompson’s test” (squeezing the calf muscle to see if the foot reacts) or a “windlass test” (pulling the toes up towards the shin to see if it causes pain).

Imaging Tests: In some cases, imaging tests may be used to help confirm the diagnosis or rule out other conditions. These may include X-rays, MRI, or ultrasound. X-rays can help identify any bone spurs or other changes in the foot structure that may be contributing to the pain. MRI and ultrasound can help assess the integrity of the plantar fascia and identify any tears or inflammation.

Who is more prone to plantar fasciitis?

Individuals with certain risk factors may be more prone to developing plantar fasciitis. Some of these risk factors include:

Age: Plantar fasciitis is most common in people between the ages of 40 and 60.

Foot structure: People with high arches or flat feet may be more prone to developing plantar fasciitis.

Weight: Being overweight or obese can increase the stress on the plantar fascia, leading to inflammation and pain.

Occupation: People who spend a lot of time standing or walking on hard surfaces, such as those in certain jobs (teacher, retail worker, chef, etc.), may be at a higher risk.

Activities: Regularly participating in activities that put a lot of stress on the feet, such as running, jumping, or dancing, can increase the risk of developing plantar fasciitis.

Tight calf muscles: Tight calf muscles can put more strain on the plantar fascia, leading to inflammation and pain.

 

Can you massage away plantar fasciitis?

Massage can be beneficial as a complementary treatment for plantar fasciitis in some cases. Massaging the affected area can help to reduce pain, increase blood flow, and stretch the fascia, which can promote healing.

However, it’s important to note that massage alone may not be enough to completely cure plantar fasciitis, and it’s best to use massage as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes stretching, strengthening, and other physical therapy exercises.

It’s also important to be cautious when massaging the affected area, as improper technique can actually worsen the pain. If you’re unsure about how to properly massage your plantar fascia, it’s best to consult with a specialist practitioner or other medical professional for guidance.

 

Is Voltarol gel good for plantar fasciitis?

Voltarol gel, which is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) topical medication, may help relieve pain and inflammation associated with plantar fasciitis. Voltarol gel works by reducing the levels of pain-causing substances in the body and reducing inflammation.

However, it’s important to note that while Voltarol gel can help manage symptoms, it will not cure the underlying cause of plantar fasciitis. It’s best to use Voltarol gel as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes stretching, strengthening, and other physical therapy exercises to address the root cause of the condition.

It’s also important to consult with a doctor before using Voltarol gel, as it may not be suitable for everyone, and there may be potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

 

Where do you rub for plantar fasciitis?

For plantar fasciitis, massage or self-massage is typically focused on the plantar fascia, which is the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot and connects the heel bone to the toes. The plantar fascia can become inflamed and cause pain, particularly near the heel and arch of the foot.

 

To self-massage the plantar fascia, you can:

Roll a golf ball or a frozen water bottle under your foot, starting from the heel and rolling forward to the ball of the foot.

Use a massage ball or a foam roller to apply pressure to the bottom of your foot, focusing on the areas where you feel pain or tightness.

Stretch your foot by pulling your toes towards you, or by using a towel to pull the toes back towards your shin.

It’s important to be gentle and avoid applying too much pressure, as this can cause pain and make the condition worse. If you experience pain or discomfort while massaging your foot, stop and consult with a doctor.

 

What can I rub on my foot for plantar fasciitis?

There are several over-the-counter products that can be used to help relieve pain and inflammation associated with plantar fasciitis. Some options include:

Topical pain relievers: Over-the-counter pain relief creams, gels, or sprays containing menthol, capsaicin, or methyl salicylate can be applied to the affected area to help relieve pain and reduce inflammation.

Ice: Applying an ice pack or a bag of frozen peas to the affected area can help reduce pain and swelling. Wrap the ice in a towel to protect your skin.

Arch supports: Over-the-counter arch supports or orthotics can help distribute your weight evenly and reduce stress on the plantar fascia.

Massage balls or foam rollers: Rolling a massage ball or foam roller under your foot can help relieve tension and improve circulation in the affected area.

It’s important to consult with a doctor before using any of these products, as some may not be suitable for everyone, and there may be potential side effects or interactions with other medications.

 

When should I see a doctor for plantar fasciitis?

You should see a doctor if you have persistent heel pain, especially if it is accompanied by swelling or difficulty walking. Your doctor can diagnose the underlying cause of your pain and recommend appropriate treatment options. Additionally, you should see a doctor if your symptoms are not improving after trying self-care measures, such as stretching and over-the-counter pain relievers, for several weeks.

If you have underlying medical conditions that put you at higher risk for developing plantar fasciitis, such as flat feet or tight calf muscles, it’s especially important to see a doctor as soon as possible. Early treatment can help prevent the condition from becoming more severe and potentially leading to chronic pain.

 

What shoes do doctors recommend for plantar fasciitis?

Doctors generally recommend shoes with good arch support and a firm, cushioned sole for people with plantar fasciitis. Some specific features that may be helpful include:

Arch support: Shoes with built-in arch support can help distribute your weight evenly and reduce stress on the plantar fascia.

Cushioned sole: A cushioned sole can help absorb shock and reduce impact on the heel and arch.

Good fit: Shoes should fit snugly and not be too tight or too loose, as this can lead to discomfort or instability.

Heel counter: A firm heel counter can help provide additional stability and support.

Rocker sole: A rocker sole can help reduce pressure on the heel and promote a more natural gait.

It’s important to note that shoes that are too old or worn out may not provide adequate support and cushioning, even if they were once appropriate for your condition. It’s recommended to replace your shoes every 300 to 500 miles or every 6 to 8 months, whichever comes first.

 

What is the best anti inflammatory for plantar fasciitis?

The best anti-inflammatory for plantar fasciitis may depend on several factors, including the severity of your pain, any other medical conditions you have, and your personal preferences. Over-the-counter (OTC) options for reducing inflammation and relieving pain include:

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): NSAIDs such as ibuprofen and naproxen can help reduce pain and swelling.

Topical pain relievers: Topical pain relievers, such as creams or gels containing capsaicin or menthol, can be applied directly to the affected area to relieve pain.

Steroid injections: In some cases, a doctor may recommend a corticosteroid injection to help reduce inflammation in the plantar fascia.

 

What are 3 treatments for plantar fasciitis?

The treatment for plantar fasciitis may vary depending on the severity and duration of symptoms, but here are three common treatments:

Stretching and Physical Therapy: Stretching and strengthening exercises can help relieve pain and improve function. Your doctor or physical therapist can recommend specific exercises to improve flexibility and strengthen the muscles and tissues in your feet and legs.

Orthotics: Custom-made orthotics or shoe inserts can help distribute pressure more evenly across the foot and reduce the strain on the plantar fascia with growing supportive research.

Medications: Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, can help reduce pain and swelling. Topical pain relievers, such as creams or gels containing capsaicin or menthol, can also be applied directly to the affected area to relieve pain. In some cases, a doctor may recommend a corticosteroid injection to help reduce inflammation.

 

How do you test for plantar fasciitis? 

Diagnosis of plantar fasciitis typically begins with a physical examination of the foot, which may include:

Inspection: Your doctor will examine your foot and assess the location of your pain and any swelling or redness.

Palpation: Your doctor will press on different parts of your foot to identify areas of tenderness.

Range of Motion: Your doctor will assess the range of motion in your foot, ankle, and toes.

Stretching Tests: Your doctor may perform a calf stretch and a toes-up plantar fascia stretch to see if the plantar fascia is tight or irritated.

In some cases, additional diagnostic tests, such as x-rays, MRI, or ultrasound, may be ordered to rule out other conditions or to get a better view of the plantar fascia.

Based on the examination, your doctor may make a diagnosis of plantar fasciitis and recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

 

How serious is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is a common and often painful foot condition that can cause significant discomfort and limit physical activity. However, it is usually not a serious condition and can be effectively treated with a combination of conservative measures, such as stretching and physical therapy, orthotics, and pain relievers.

In most cases, plantar fasciitis can be resolved within a few months with proper treatment and a gradual return to physical activity. However, if left untreated or if the underlying causes are not addressed, plantar fasciitis can persist and become a chronic condition, causing ongoing pain and discomfort.

 

Is plantar fasciitis related to stress?

Plantar fasciitis can be related to stress in several ways. The plantar fascia is a band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, connecting the heel bone to the toes. This tissue helps absorb shock and support the foot during physical activity.

Physical stress, such as repetitive strain, overuse, or sudden increase in physical activity, can cause small tears or inflammation in the plantar fascia, leading to plantar fasciitis.

Additionally, systemic stress, such as stress from work, financial, or personal life, can increase tension and tightness in the muscles and tissues throughout the body, including the foot and ankle. This can lead to changes in walking patterns, gait, and posture, which can put additional strain on the plantar fascia, leading to pain and discomfort.

Therefore, reducing physical and systemic stress can help prevent and manage plantar fasciitis, along with other conservative treatments such as stretching, physical therapy, orthotics, and pain relievers.

 

Why do I have plantar fasciitis in one foot?

Having plantar fasciitis in one foot can be due to several factors, such as:

Unequal weight distribution: If you have an unequal weight distribution when you walk or stand, this can put more strain on one foot and cause plantar fasciitis in that foot.

Foot anatomy: Differences in the shape, size, and structure of your feet can make one foot more susceptible to plantar fasciitis.

Previous injury: If you have had a previous injury to one foot, such as a sprain or fracture, this can increase the risk of developing plantar fasciitis in that foot.

Overuse: If you engage in physical activities that put repetitive strain on one foot, such as running or jumping, this can increase the risk of developing plantar fasciitis in that foot.

Footwear: Wearing shoes that are worn out, don’t fit properly, or don’t provide adequate support can increase the risk of developing plantar fasciitis in one foot.

 

How do I get rid of plantar fasciitis forever?

Getting rid of plantar fasciitis permanently may require a combination of treatment methods and lifestyle changes. Here are some steps that can help:

Rest and reduce activity: Reduce or avoid activities that put excessive strain on your feet, such as running, jumping, or standing for long periods of time.

Ice and pain relief medication: Applying ice and taking over-the-counter pain relief medication, such as ibuprofen, can help reduce pain and swelling.

Stretching and physical therapy: Stretching and physical therapy exercises can help improve flexibility and strengthen the muscles and tissues in your feet, reducing the strain on the plantar fascia.

Orthotics: Wearing custom orthotics or arch supports can help redistribute the weight on your feet and reduce the strain on the plantar fascia.

Footwear: Wear shoes that provide adequate support and cushioning, especially when engaging in physical activities. Avoid shoes that are worn out or don’t fit properly.

Maintain a healthy weight: Maintaining a healthy weight can help reduce the strain on the plantar fascia and prevent the condition from worsening.

Surgery: In severe cases of plantar fasciitis, surgery may be necessary to release the tension in the plantar fascia and promote healing.

 

How does rolling a ball help plantar fasciitis?

Rolling a ball is often used as part of a physical therapy program to help alleviate pain and improve mobility in people with plantar fasciitis. The rolling helps to stretch and massage the plantar fascia, the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot and supports the arch.

By rolling the foot over a ball, the fascia is gently stretched, increasing circulation and helping to reduce pain and inflammation. The massage-like action also helps to break up any scar tissue or adhesions in the fascia, promoting healing and reducing tightness.

Using a ball to roll the foot is a simple and convenient way to perform this type of self-massage and stretch, and can be done at home or at the office.

 

Is arch pain the same as plantar fasciitis?

Arch pain and plantar fasciitis are often used interchangeably, but they are not exactly the same thing. Arch pain refers to any pain or discomfort in the arch of the foot, which is the curved area along the bottom of the foot that runs from the heel to the toes.

Plantar fasciitis, on the other hand, is a specific condition that is characterized by pain and inflammation in the plantar fascia, the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot and supports the arch. So, while arch pain can be a symptom of plantar fasciitis, not all arch pain is caused by this specific condition.

 

What is stage 3 plantar fasciitis?

The stages of plantar fasciitis are not widely recognised or well-defined in medical literature. The term “stage 3 plantar fasciitis” is not a commonly used or widely accepted term.

Plantar fasciitis is a condition characterized by pain and inflammation in the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot and supports the arch. The severity of the pain and inflammation can vary from person to person, but is typically classified as acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) based on the duration and frequency of the symptoms.

 

Why won’t my plantar fasciitis go away?

Plantar fasciitis can be a persistent condition and may not go away easily. Here are some reasons why your plantar fasciitis might not be improving:

Lack of proper treatment: Not following a proper treatment plan or not doing enough to manage the symptoms can prevent plantar fasciitis from healing.

Continuing high-impact activities: Engaging in high-impact activities such as running, jumping, or even standing for long periods of time can put additional stress on the plantar fascia and delay recovery.

Poor foot support: Wearing shoes that do not provide proper support to the foot can increase the strain on the plantar fascia and worsen the symptoms.

Other underlying conditions: Plantar fasciitis can be associated with other conditions such as obesity, flat feet, and poor posture, which can also contribute to the persistence of the symptoms.

Chronic plantar fasciitis: If the symptoms have been present for more than 6 months, it is considered chronic plantar fasciitis, which can be more difficult to treat.

 

What is the classic symptom for a patient with plantar fasciitis?

The classic symptom of plantar fasciitis is pain or discomfort in the bottom of the foot, near the heel or along the arch. This pain is often described as a sharp, stabbing pain that is worst in the morning, after rest, or after physical activity. Some people describe it as feeling like they have a pebble in their shoe or walking on eggshells. The pain may subside after a few minutes of activity, but can return after prolonged standing or walking. Other symptoms of plantar fasciitis can include:

Swelling in the bottom of the foot

Stiffness in the foot, especially in the morning

Redness and warmth to the touch in the affected area

Decreased range of motion in the foot and ankle.

Is paracetamol or ibuprofen better for plantar fasciitis?

Paracetamol and ibuprofen are both commonly used to relieve pain and inflammation, but the choice between the two for treating plantar fasciitis will depend on a number of factors, including an individual’s specific health condition and personal preferences.

Paracetamol is a pain reliever that is commonly used to treat mild to moderate pain, including headaches, muscle aches, and arthritis. It is generally considered a safe and effective pain reliever when taken as directed, but does not have anti-inflammatory properties.

Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that not only relieves pain, but also has anti-inflammatory properties that can reduce swelling and inflammation in the affected area.

Both paracetamol and ibuprofen can be effective in relieving the pain and discomfort associated with plantar fasciitis, but ibuprofen may be a better choice for individuals who have a significant amount of inflammation in the affected area.

 

Is heat or cold better for plantar fasciitis?

Heat and cold therapy are both commonly used to relieve the pain and discomfort associated with plantar fasciitis, but the choice between heat and cold will depend on the stage and severity of the condition, as well as an individual’s specific preferences.

Cold therapy, such as using a cold pack or ice massage, can help reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation in the affected area. It is especially effective in the early stages of plantar fasciitis, when there is a lot of inflammation present. Cold therapy can also help to numb the area and reduce pain, making it a good option for those who experience pain while walking or standing.

Heat therapy, such as using a hot pack or taking a warm bath, can help to increase blood flow to the affected area and relax tight muscles and fascia. This can help to reduce pain, stiffness, and discomfort associated with plantar fasciitis, especially in the later stages of the condition when there is less inflammation present.

Ultimately, the choice between heat and cold therapy for plantar fasciitis will depend on an individual’s specific symptoms, pain tolerance, and personal preferences. It is always a good idea to talk to a doctor before using heat or cold therapy, especially if you have any pre-existing health conditions or are taking any other medications.

 

Are Birkenstocks good for plantar fasciitis?

Birkenstocks are often recommended for people with plantar fasciitis as they offer good arch support and a spacious toe box, which can help alleviate pressure on the plantar fascia. The cork and latex footbed provides a comfortable and supportive base, which can help to reduce stress on the foot and reduce pain associated with plantar fasciitis.

However, it is important to keep in mind that what works best for one person may not work for another, as everyone’s feet and specific needs are different. Therefore, it is important to try on several different types of shoes and find the one that provides the best fit, support, and comfort for your individual needs.

 

Does plantar fasciitis hurt all day?

Plantar fasciitis can cause pain that ranges from mild to severe, and the intensity of the pain can vary depending on the individual and the stage of the condition. Some people experience pain primarily when they first get out of bed in the morning or after long periods of sitting or standing, while others may experience pain throughout the day.

 

Does walking on tiptoes help plantar fasciitis?

Walking on tiptoes may temporarily alleviate the pain associated with plantar fasciitis, but it is not considered an effective long-term treatment for the condition. In fact, walking on tiptoes can put additional stress on the plantar fascia and other structures in the foot, which can make the pain worse.

The best way to manage plantar fasciitis is to reduce the strain on the plantar fascia and support the foot with proper shoes, orthotics, and other supportive devices. Stretching and strengthening exercises, ice therapy, and rest can also help to reduce pain and promote healing.

 

Note:
The above information is for general reference only and should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. It’s important to work with a healthcare provider to develop an individualized diagnosis and treatment plan for plantar fasciitis.

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